Pregnancy, Parenting and Other Articles

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Prostate cancer: Case to test men in their 40s

Men could be offered a screening test for prostate cancer in their late 40s, a study suggests.The idea is controversial as prostate specific antigen (PSA) testing can be unreliable, throwing up false positive results that can cause undue worry and even treatment over something benign.Swedish researchers say checking every man aged 45-49 would predict nearly half of all prostate cancer deaths. A recent prostate cancer screening trial in Europe, ERSPC, showed that screening reduced mortality by 20%. However, this was associated with a high level of "over treatment". To save one life, 48 additional cases of prostate cancer needed to be treated. More...

Beetroot 'can lower blood pressure'

Drinking a cup of beetroot juice can lower blood pressure, researchers say. Drinking 250ml (8oz) cut high blood pressure readings by 10mm of mercury (mmHg) in a study of 15 patients, bringing some into the normal range, the journal Hypertension reports. Most marked after three to six hours, the effect was detectable a day later. Scientists say the nitrate in beetroot widens blood vessels to aid flow. And many people with angina use a nitrate drug to ease their symptoms. More...

Breastfeeding for Six Months Can Significantly Cut Risk of Cancer Death

Women still confused by the breast milk vs. formula debate may want to listen up, as a new study has found exclusively breastfeeding your baby for at least six months could cut your chances of dying from cancer and all other diseases by 17 percent—and death by heart disease alone by 8 percent. The mass study, published online Wednesday in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, examined breastfeeding and other lifestyle recommendations from the American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR) and its umbrella World Cancer Research Fund International and their effects on nearly 380,000 people in several European countries over 13 years. More...

Tags:Baby feeding

Sensitive Gag Reflex: Transition to Textured Foods

Some babies and children have problems taking and swallowing food that is not smooth. These children will often do well with smooth pureed (say: PYOOR-aid) foods, such as commercial first baby foods in jars. When they are given pureed foods that are not smooth, they will often gag and sometimes vomit (throw up). As a result, their parents will often go back to the smooth purees, which the child likes. More...

Three-person IVF moves closer in UK

he UK has moved closer to becoming the first country to allow the creation of babies from three people. The Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA) has advised the government that there is no evidence the advanced forms of IVF were unsafe. The fertility regulator's public consultation also showed "general support" for the idea as the benefits outweighed the risks. A final decision on whether to press ahead rests with ministers. More...

Baby food recipes and make-and-freeze tips

As a new parent, there are so many things to think about. Is my baby safe? Is my baby healthy? How do I get her to sleep? When do I get to sleep? So many of these things are a little bit out of your control, riding mainly on the innate character traits of the little one who just entered your life. Thankfully, there are a few things that are totally within your control. And one of these is what goes into that precious little tummy. More...

Baby bath basics: A parent's guide

Bathing a slippery newborn can be a nerve-racking experience. Your baby may not like it much, either. With a little practice, however, you'll both start to feel more comfortable at bath time. Start by learning baby bath basics. How often does my newborn need a bath?There's no need to give your newborn a bath every day. In fact, bathing your baby more than several times a week can dry out his or her skin. If you're quick with clean diapers and burp cloths, you're already cleaning the parts that really need attention — the face, neck and diaper area. More...

Feeding Method Can Impact Child's Health For Years

A new study suggests the way babies are born and fed in early life affects the bacteria they carry around in their gut. And that in turn may influence their future health, including things like whether they will develop asthma, allergies or other medical conditions. The study, conducted by researchers at the University of Alberta, is published in this week's issue of the Canadian Medical Association Journal. More...

Obese mums weaken babies' hearts

The walls of the body's major artery – the aorta – are already thickened in babies born to mothers who are overweight or obese, according to a University of Sydney study published online in the Fetal and Neonatal Edition of Archives of Disease of Childhood. The study found that, importantly, this arterial thickening, which is a sign of heart disease, is independent of the child's weight at birth – a known risk factor for later heart disease and stroke. More...

Scientists say child born with HIV apparently cured, offers clues for fighting pediatric AIDS

A baby born with the virus that causes AIDS appears to have been cured, scientists announced Sunday, describing the case of a child from Mississippi who's now 2 1/2 and has been off medication for about a year with no signs of infection. There's no guarantee the child will remain healthy, although sophisticated testing uncovered just traces of the virus' genetic material still lingering. If so, it would mark only the world's second reported cure.  More...

Whooping cough outbreak: Cases decreasing

The number of people being infected with whooping cough is decreasing in England and Wales, according to the latest figures by the Health Protection Agency. However, it is too soon to tell if the largest outbreak of the disease in two decades has peaked. There were 1,080 new cases in November compared with 1,631 the month before. Thirteen newborn babies have died during the outbreak leading to a campaign to vaccinate pregnant women. More...

Too much vitamin D during pregnancy linked to food allergies in kids

High vitamin D levels in expectant mothers appear to raise the risk of children developing a food allergy after birth, a new study has found. The survey carried out by the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research and the Martin Luther University in Halle-Wittenberg in Germany has concluded that pregnant women should avoid taking vitamin D supplements. Dr. Kristin Weibe's team from Leipzig used samples from the LiNA cohort that the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ) had established together with the St. Georg municipal clinic between 2006 and 2008 headed by Dr. Irina Lehmann. More...

Tags:Pregnancy,Pregnancy Care
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